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Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)

International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation*

Table of contents | Corrigenda | How to order
Multilingual Summaries

Almost 3% of the world’s population – or about 190 million people – live outside the land of their birth. These migrants bring energy, entrepreneurship and fresh ideas to our societies. But there are downsides, too: Young migrants who fail in education, adults who don’t find work and, of course, unregulated migration. Such challenges make migration a political lightning rod. But how can we move beyond the noise of debate to get to the facts?

OECD Insights: International Migration explores migration today, and asks this question: How can governments ensure it benefits immigrants, the societies in which they settle and the homes they leave behind?

Table of contents

Foreword by Anthony Gooch Director, Public Affairs and Communications Directorate, OECD

Chapter 1. The Migration Debate

Migration can be controversial, in part because it touches on so many areas of public life, including economics, demographics, national security, culture and even religion.

Chapter 2. Migration Then and Now

For almost as long as humans have walked the Earth, we have sought new homes. Today, that journey continues for many millions of people around the globe.

Chapter 3. Managing Migration

Our ability to travel is restricted by international rules and regulations. But, equally, international agreements give many people significant rights to settle abroad.

Chapter 4. Migration and Education

The track record of young immigrants in schooling is mixed – some do exceptionally well but others encounter problems that can hold them back throughout life.

Chapter 5. Migrants and Work

Migrants can be a key addition to the workforce, even if their presence may be resented and they are not always able to make the best use of their skills.

Chapter 6. Migration and Development

For developing countries, migration can be a blessing by providing remittances and overseas contacts, but a curse for taking away the brightest and the best.

Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion…

Policies will need to go on evolving if migrants, the societies they leave and those they join are to continue benefiting from migration. Plus: How migration is measured.

References

*OECD Insights

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