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WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON IMMIGRANTS AND THEIR CHILDREN? (by OECD)

Both the experience from previous economic crises and first indications on labour market and social outcomes during the current pandemic suggest that the COVID-19 crisis is likely to have a disproportionate impact on immigrants and their children. Please read the analysis: https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/?ref=137_137245-8saheqv0k3&title=What-is-the-impact-of-the-COVID-19-pandemic-on-immigrants-and-their-children%3F

 

 

Education at a Glance 2020 by OECD

Education at a Glance is the authoritative source for information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the structure, finances and performance of education systems across OECD countries and a number of partner economies. More than 100 charts and tables in this publication – as well as links to much more available on the educational database – provide key information on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; access, participation and progression in education; the financial resources invested in education; and teachers, the learning environment and the organisation of schools. The 2020 edition includes

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Facing the jobs crisis*

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered one of the worst jobs crises since the Great Depression. There is a real danger that the crisis will increase poverty and widen inequalities, with the impact felt for years to come. Countries now need to do everything they can to stop this jobs crisis from turning into a social crisis. Reconstructing a better and more resilient labour market is an essential investment in the future and in future generations.

http://oecd.org/employment-outlook?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=digitalreport&utm_campaign=empoutlookjul2020&utm_term=pac

Report: OECD Employment Outlook 2020 WORKER SECURITY AND THE COVID-19 CRISIS

*OECD

How have countries dealt with coronavirus school closures and what’s next for education? (OECD)

With schools closed around the world, students and teachers are having to find new ways of learning outside of the classroom. Meanwhile, governments are working hard to assess the impact of school closures and make plans for education in a post-crisis world – a world that may well be fundamentally altered. What have the government responses been like so far? Have they worked? And does the crisis imply that we need to change the way we educate the next generation?

OECD Policy Observatory on Artificial Intelligence*

https://www.oecd.org/going-digital/ai/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=FIND%20OUT%20MORE&utm_campaign=OECD%20Civil%20Society%20Newsletter%20-%20February%202020&utm_term=demo

Oxford diversity jumps *

A record 70% of Oxford University’s undergraduates next year will come from state schools. Five years ago state school applicants to Oxford received just 56% of undergraduate offers and 43% went to those educated at independent schools, despite a substantial imbalance in the numbers applying. The university found itself regularly criticised for ignoring well-qualified, state-educated students, especially from black or disadvantaged backgrounds. Target Oxbridge – a diversity recruitment programme which has the author Zadie Smith as a patron – says it has helped a record number of British students of black heritage gain places at Oxford and Cambridge. Naomi Kellman, one of its founders, said: “We started with just six students in 2012, and so it is amazing to see the programme now supporting over 70 black British students to secure Oxbridge offers.”

*The Guardian

How to be Human: The Manual by Ruby Wax*

Probably as many science-fiction books will tell you, it was all part of the ‘bigger plan’ that we evolved to this moment in time to build computers that can take over from the old worn-out models called ‘us’. What’s coming in the future is coming. You can’t stop evolution, and the technological add-ons that are here, or almost here, are becoming extensions of us.  Continue reading

Facing the Unknown: Does ICT exclude or include?*

As we probably all know by now, the digital transformation is not a trend but a deep change in our societies, economic models and ways to communicate and consume; a rising world of robotics to replace human muscles and artificial intelligence (AI) to replace human brains. Everyone is facing this revolution, all sectors, all people, all countries. Everyone is feeling the consequences: jobs will evolve or disappear, knowledge is available to all for the best and the worst and relationships and social hierarchy are being shaken up. Continue reading

A Temporary Shift: What happens when immigrants have to wait longer to obtain permanent residency?*

*https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/180128-birthe-larsen/posts/52950-a-temporary-shift-what-happens-when-immigrants-have-to-wait-longer-to-obtain-permanent-residency?utm_source=newsletter_mailer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

The future of work is now*

Through the “I am the Future of Work campaign”, the OECD is seeking to contribute to a positive future of work. We are gathering people’s perspectives and ideas about work and fostering solutions-oriented conversations across sectors and countries. Together, we can build a better world of work for all.

Have your say                           http://newsletter.oecd.org/q/143OPr5b44moDuhMZ7iDm/wv

*OECD newsletter 

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