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The future of work is now*

Through the “I am the Future of Work campaign”, the OECD is seeking to contribute to a positive future of work. We are gathering people’s perspectives and ideas about work and fostering solutions-oriented conversations across sectors and countries. Together, we can build a better world of work for all.

Have your say                           http://newsletter.oecd.org/q/143OPr5b44moDuhMZ7iDm/wv

*OECD newsletter 

Going Digital Toolkit*

The Going Digital Toolkit helps countries assess their state of digital development and formulate policy strategies and approaches in response. Data exploration and visualisation are key features of the Toolkit.

*OECD

International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation*

Table of contents | Corrigenda | How to order
Multilingual Summaries

Almost 3% of the world’s population – or about 190 million people – live outside the land of their birth. These migrants bring energy, entrepreneurship and fresh ideas to our societies. But there are downsides, too: Young migrants who fail in education, adults who don’t find work and, of course, unregulated migration. Such challenges make migration a political lightning rod. But how can we move beyond the noise of debate to get to the facts?

OECD Insights: International Migration explores migration today, and asks this question: How can governments ensure it benefits immigrants, the societies in which they settle and the homes they leave behind?

Table of contents

Foreword by Anthony Gooch Director, Public Affairs and Communications Directorate, OECD

Chapter 1. The Migration Debate

Migration can be controversial, in part because it touches on so many areas of public life, including economics, demographics, national security, culture and even religion.

Chapter 2. Migration Then and Now

For almost as long as humans have walked the Earth, we have sought new homes. Today, that journey continues for many millions of people around the globe.

Chapter 3. Managing Migration

Our ability to travel is restricted by international rules and regulations. But, equally, international agreements give many people significant rights to settle abroad.

Chapter 4. Migration and Education

The track record of young immigrants in schooling is mixed – some do exceptionally well but others encounter problems that can hold them back throughout life.

Chapter 5. Migrants and Work

Migrants can be a key addition to the workforce, even if their presence may be resented and they are not always able to make the best use of their skills.

Chapter 6. Migration and Development

For developing countries, migration can be a blessing by providing remittances and overseas contacts, but a curse for taking away the brightest and the best.

Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion…

Policies will need to go on evolving if migrants, the societies they leave and those they join are to continue benefiting from migration. Plus: How migration is measured.

References

*OECD Insights

People power: Collective intelligence in the new era of international co-operation*

We live in stark times: times when the values of openness, collaboration and global integration are being questioned; times when the notion of citizenship and engagement are being reframed; times when information sharing, meaning and truth take on a new dimension, in a digital, direct and fast paced 21st century. As an Organisation emerging from the rubble of the Second World War, we know only too well that peace cannot be taken for granted. On a daily basis, we live and breathe how dialogue and co-operation can help strengthen a peaceful world and improve people’s lives.

Today, we are communicating in an environment where public opinion is divided based on very different experiences of life. If we want to get through to people, we need to speak a language that resonates with their experiences…

The 10th anniversary of the global financial crisis provides us all with the opportunity to pause and reflect on the distance between classical economic thinking, and the models it was based on, and the reality of people’s everyday lives — lives that are still feeling the effects of the Global Financial Crisis a decade later.

Please follow the article here: https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/40211-anthony-gooch/posts/40876-people-power-collective-intelligence-in-the-new-era-of-international-co-operation.

The changing landscape requires us to broaden the spectrum of our engagement, acknowledging, once and for all, that, in a multifaceted and multistakeholder world, policy making is no longer the sole remit of governments. A plethora of influential voices are rising to the fore, whether organised civil society or spontaneous citizen movements, joining forces to spark creativity, inject disruption and instill sustained change. Such voices are not only helping in designing and implementing global solutions: they play a key role in adapting them locally so they have real impact on people’s lives.

*OECD, Anthony Gooch

Going up?*

“All human beings are born equal. But on the following day, they no longer are,” said French author Jean Renard in 1907. This is because sticky floors and ceilings–or rags to rags and riches to riches–define the bottom and top income distributions. Today, it takes four to five generations, on average, for children from the poorest 10% of the population to reach median income levels. Meanwhile, about 50% of children of wealthy parents will themselves remain rich in countries like Germany and the US.

Worse, every four years, a fifth of the middle class’ poorest fall down to the bottom of the income distribution while its upper half enjoys much greater security, as shown in A Broken Social Elevator? How to Promote Social Mobility.

What’s more, in countries like Brazil and South Africa where income inequality is high, there is a state of “permanent inequality”, with an underlying feeling that social mobility is but a broken promise. Indeed, low upward mobility increases people’s sense that their voices do not matter and that the system is neither fair nor meritocratic.

Still, mobility is not all about money. It can range from jobs to education and health, and it changes when viewed through each of these lenses. These distortions create unique situations within each country: in places like Japan and Korea, educational mobility is higher than income mobility, but it’s the other way around in Norway and Spain. In the US, job mobility is higher than earnings mobility, while in Finland it’s the reverse, with lower educational mobility on top.

Yet there is nothing inevitable about socio-economic status being passed down between generations. Equal access to quality education is one way to enhance social mobility: countries that spend more on public education tend to achieve higher educational mobility. The same goes for health. Moreover, progressive taxation on wealth, inheritance and combatting tax avoidance leads to less sticky ceilings, while money transfers or benefits to low-income families and improving the school-to-work transition unsticks the floors. And as the report shows, policies that address the likes of residential segregation and sudden unemployment, or aim to improve the work-home balance can enhance social mobility across the board.

*The OECD Observer

53 developing nations promised to increase spending

Positive news: “The emerging story from a major education summit in Senegal is about developing countries investing even more in education. Donors such as the UK, US, France and Canada pledged $2.3 billion to help the Global Partnership for Education’s work over the next three years. On the same stage in Dakar, 53 developing nations promised to increase spending on their own school systems by a total of $110 billion. And Senegal became the first African country to become a donor to other developing nations.” (theirworld.org, February’18)

Mohamed Sidibay for Theirworld and Global Partnership for Education’s conference in Senegal,

Dear Mariela,

A few days ago, I asked you: what is the one question you want me to ask  world leaders?

It was a few hours before a key moment for the campaign to fund education – the Global Partnership for Education’s replenishment conference in Dakar, Senegal, where I was going to deliver the keynote speech.

And you were clear that the biggest question of the moment was: what will you do to turn the decline in education financing around and ensure that every child can realise their right to education?

To be honest, when I sent you that email, I was feeling a bit sceptical. For years aid to education has been stagnating or going down. I’ve spoken at big events before.

What was going to change this time? And why now? Continue reading

How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies*

Link to How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies

*OECD Development Centre

Key Facts on Education (OECD)

Key Facts on Education (OECD)
Did You Know? Key Facts on Education

A portrait of family migration*

Migration is all over the news in Europe, North America and Australia. When people think about migration, they tend to picture either refugees driven to undertake dangerous journeys in order to escape threatening situations or people coming to a new country to pursue studies or work. Yet there is a large category of migrants all too often overlooked: family migrants. Such migrants accounted for 40% of migration to the OECD area in 2015 and they typically make up 25-50% of an OECD country’s foreign-born population – and as much as 70% in the United States.

Why is family migration receiving so little attention? Continue reading

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