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How have countries dealt with coronavirus school closures and what’s next for education? (OECD)

With schools closed around the world, students and teachers are having to find new ways of learning outside of the classroom. Meanwhile, governments are working hard to assess the impact of school closures and make plans for education in a post-crisis world – a world that may well be fundamentally altered. What have the government responses been like so far? Have they worked? And does the crisis imply that we need to change the way we educate the next generation?

OECD Policy Observatory on Artificial Intelligence*

https://www.oecd.org/going-digital/ai/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=FIND%20OUT%20MORE&utm_campaign=OECD%20Civil%20Society%20Newsletter%20-%20February%202020&utm_term=demo

Oxford diversity jumps *

A record 70% of Oxford University’s undergraduates next year will come from state schools. Five years ago state school applicants to Oxford received just 56% of undergraduate offers and 43% went to those educated at independent schools, despite a substantial imbalance in the numbers applying. The university found itself regularly criticised for ignoring well-qualified, state-educated students, especially from black or disadvantaged backgrounds. Target Oxbridge – a diversity recruitment programme which has the author Zadie Smith as a patron – says it has helped a record number of British students of black heritage gain places at Oxford and Cambridge. Naomi Kellman, one of its founders, said: “We started with just six students in 2012, and so it is amazing to see the programme now supporting over 70 black British students to secure Oxbridge offers.”

*The Guardian

How to be Human: The Manual by Ruby Wax*

Probably as many science-fiction books will tell you, it was all part of the ‘bigger plan’ that we evolved to this moment in time to build computers that can take over from the old worn-out models called ‘us’. What’s coming in the future is coming. You can’t stop evolution, and the technological add-ons that are here, or almost here, are becoming extensions of us.  Continue reading

Facing the Unknown: Does ICT exclude or include?*

As we probably all know by now, the digital transformation is not a trend but a deep change in our societies, economic models and ways to communicate and consume; a rising world of robotics to replace human muscles and artificial intelligence (AI) to replace human brains. Everyone is facing this revolution, all sectors, all people, all countries. Everyone is feeling the consequences: jobs will evolve or disappear, knowledge is available to all for the best and the worst and relationships and social hierarchy are being shaken up. Continue reading

A Temporary Shift: What happens when immigrants have to wait longer to obtain permanent residency?*

*https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/180128-birthe-larsen/posts/52950-a-temporary-shift-what-happens-when-immigrants-have-to-wait-longer-to-obtain-permanent-residency?utm_source=newsletter_mailer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

The future of work is now*

Through the “I am the Future of Work campaign”, the OECD is seeking to contribute to a positive future of work. We are gathering people’s perspectives and ideas about work and fostering solutions-oriented conversations across sectors and countries. Together, we can build a better world of work for all.

Have your say                           http://newsletter.oecd.org/q/143OPr5b44moDuhMZ7iDm/wv

*OECD newsletter 

Going Digital Toolkit*

The Going Digital Toolkit helps countries assess their state of digital development and formulate policy strategies and approaches in response. Data exploration and visualisation are key features of the Toolkit.

*OECD

International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation*

Table of contents | Corrigenda | How to order
Multilingual Summaries

Almost 3% of the world’s population – or about 190 million people – live outside the land of their birth. These migrants bring energy, entrepreneurship and fresh ideas to our societies. But there are downsides, too: Young migrants who fail in education, adults who don’t find work and, of course, unregulated migration. Such challenges make migration a political lightning rod. But how can we move beyond the noise of debate to get to the facts?

OECD Insights: International Migration explores migration today, and asks this question: How can governments ensure it benefits immigrants, the societies in which they settle and the homes they leave behind?

Table of contents

Foreword by Anthony Gooch Director, Public Affairs and Communications Directorate, OECD

Chapter 1. The Migration Debate

Migration can be controversial, in part because it touches on so many areas of public life, including economics, demographics, national security, culture and even religion.

Chapter 2. Migration Then and Now

For almost as long as humans have walked the Earth, we have sought new homes. Today, that journey continues for many millions of people around the globe.

Chapter 3. Managing Migration

Our ability to travel is restricted by international rules and regulations. But, equally, international agreements give many people significant rights to settle abroad.

Chapter 4. Migration and Education

The track record of young immigrants in schooling is mixed – some do exceptionally well but others encounter problems that can hold them back throughout life.

Chapter 5. Migrants and Work

Migrants can be a key addition to the workforce, even if their presence may be resented and they are not always able to make the best use of their skills.

Chapter 6. Migration and Development

For developing countries, migration can be a blessing by providing remittances and overseas contacts, but a curse for taking away the brightest and the best.

Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion…

Policies will need to go on evolving if migrants, the societies they leave and those they join are to continue benefiting from migration. Plus: How migration is measured.

References

*OECD Insights

People power: Collective intelligence in the new era of international co-operation*

We live in stark times: times when the values of openness, collaboration and global integration are being questioned; times when the notion of citizenship and engagement are being reframed; times when information sharing, meaning and truth take on a new dimension, in a digital, direct and fast paced 21st century. As an Organisation emerging from the rubble of the Second World War, we know only too well that peace cannot be taken for granted. On a daily basis, we live and breathe how dialogue and co-operation can help strengthen a peaceful world and improve people’s lives.

Today, we are communicating in an environment where public opinion is divided based on very different experiences of life. If we want to get through to people, we need to speak a language that resonates with their experiences…

The 10th anniversary of the global financial crisis provides us all with the opportunity to pause and reflect on the distance between classical economic thinking, and the models it was based on, and the reality of people’s everyday lives — lives that are still feeling the effects of the Global Financial Crisis a decade later.

Please follow the article here: https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/40211-anthony-gooch/posts/40876-people-power-collective-intelligence-in-the-new-era-of-international-co-operation.

The changing landscape requires us to broaden the spectrum of our engagement, acknowledging, once and for all, that, in a multifaceted and multistakeholder world, policy making is no longer the sole remit of governments. A plethora of influential voices are rising to the fore, whether organised civil society or spontaneous citizen movements, joining forces to spark creativity, inject disruption and instill sustained change. Such voices are not only helping in designing and implementing global solutions: they play a key role in adapting them locally so they have real impact on people’s lives.

*OECD, Anthony Gooch

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