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The humanitarian issue of our generation (by Legatum Institute)

Across the world today, there are more vulnerable migrants on the move than ever before. For far too many, this is a journey of necessity, not of choice.

International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation*

Table of contents | Corrigenda | How to order
Multilingual Summaries

Almost 3% of the world’s population – or about 190 million people – live outside the land of their birth. These migrants bring energy, entrepreneurship and fresh ideas to our societies. But there are downsides, too: Young migrants who fail in education, adults who don’t find work and, of course, unregulated migration. Such challenges make migration a political lightning rod. But how can we move beyond the noise of debate to get to the facts?

OECD Insights: International Migration explores migration today, and asks this question: How can governments ensure it benefits immigrants, the societies in which they settle and the homes they leave behind?

Table of contents

Foreword by Anthony Gooch Director, Public Affairs and Communications Directorate, OECD

Chapter 1. The Migration Debate

Migration can be controversial, in part because it touches on so many areas of public life, including economics, demographics, national security, culture and even religion.

Chapter 2. Migration Then and Now

For almost as long as humans have walked the Earth, we have sought new homes. Today, that journey continues for many millions of people around the globe.

Chapter 3. Managing Migration

Our ability to travel is restricted by international rules and regulations. But, equally, international agreements give many people significant rights to settle abroad.

Chapter 4. Migration and Education

The track record of young immigrants in schooling is mixed – some do exceptionally well but others encounter problems that can hold them back throughout life.

Chapter 5. Migrants and Work

Migrants can be a key addition to the workforce, even if their presence may be resented and they are not always able to make the best use of their skills.

Chapter 6. Migration and Development

For developing countries, migration can be a blessing by providing remittances and overseas contacts, but a curse for taking away the brightest and the best.

Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion…

Policies will need to go on evolving if migrants, the societies they leave and those they join are to continue benefiting from migration. Plus: How migration is measured.

References

*OECD Insights

Rohingya refugee children*

Rohingya refugee children would love to be at school. But in their vast camps in Bangladesh, only 30% of them are getting an education – and most of these children have just two hours of lessons a day. UN Secretary-General António Guterres visited Rohingya families and said: “Nothing could have prepared me for the scale of the crisis and extent of suffering.”

*credit: Theirworld.org

Most children in UK’s poorest areas now growing up in poverty*

More than half of all children in the UK’s very poorest areas are now growing up in poverty as the impact of cuts to benefits continues to be felt by the least well-off families, according to a new study.

*by , Social policy editor of The Guardian

Rohingya refugee children need urgent help to deal with their trauma*

Safe spaces and schools are vital if huge numbers of children fleeing from violence in Myanmar are to recover from their toxic stress.

Almost 60% of the Rohingya refugees fleeing ethnic atrocities in Myanmar are children – and many are escaping on their own.

Stories of violence against women and children – villages burned, infants thrown in rivers, toddlers and mothers shot – abound from makeshift camps in neighbouring Bangladesh, where survivors are struggling to find clean water, food and proper shelter.

Hundreds of children at the camps have been separated from their families and the numbers are growing daily.  Continue reading

Building the Future: Children and Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries – Innocenti Report*

Building the Future: Children and Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries is the latest in the Innocenti Report Card series, which analyses inequality in 41 high-income countries. It looks at how far children are falling behind in the dimensions of income, education, health and life satisfaction. Continue reading

For globalisation to work for all, you have to level the playing field first*

Today the debate rages about whether the decline in living standards is due to the effects of globalisation or to poor domestic policies. Both have surely played a role. But the problems often associated with globalisation (inequality, the hollowing out of the middle class, employment of less-skilled workers in advanced countries, etc.) do not originate from “openness” as such. The problem is that not all countries are open to the same degree and the playing field in the cross-border activities of businesses is not level. Continue reading

Timor-Leste: Life beyond oil*

The end of the oil era may be coming, but the lights will stay on in Timor Leste. Almost two-thirds of the population are younger than 24, and they are keen for a chance at a better life. With the right mix of inclusive planning, grassroots development and support for a vital private sector, the transition to a non-oil economy may signal bright days ahead for this young nation.

Timor Leste has achieved remarkable progress since restoration of independence in 2002. Continue reading

A home truth: We need better quality and more affordable housing*

Alice Pittini, OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

A home is meant to be a safe and secure shelter for individuals and families, fulfilling the basic need to have a roof over your head. Yet a home is also a tradable asset, an investment from which there’s potentially big money to be made, or to be lost as the global financial crisis has shown us. Although the crisis led to a general drop in house prices in the short term, house prices have since picked up again in most countries and today they are growing faster than incomes in Austria, Canada, Germany, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Continue reading

Empower a Girl. Change the World.

Dear Colleagues,

Throughout the world, adolescent girls are at risk of disappearing from the international development agenda and public awareness.

Despite progress in many arenas, adolescent girls risk disappearing from lack of education. They are disappearing because of preventable diseases. They are disappearing because of child marriage. They are disappearing from lack of investment in policies, interventions and services tailored to their specific needs and concerns.

At the same time there are nearly 600 million girls aged 10 to 19 in the world today, each with limitless individual potential. Continue reading

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