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Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)

News of the Day

Malta car bomb kills Panama Papers journalist

Madrid jails Catalan separatist leaders pending investigation

Mogadishu truck bomb: 500 casualties in Somalia’s worst terrorist attack

North Korean UN envoy says ‘nuclear war may break out at any moment’

UN report on Rohingya hunger is shelved at Myanmar’s request

credit: The Guardian

 

 Alarm: “By 2030, there will be 800 million children – half the children in the world – who will not finish school with any qualifications whatsoever. That is indeed a crisis that has got to be dealt with.” – Gordon Brown, former UK PM

Positive: On September 14, 2017, big headline comes relating to Syrian refugee childrenTurkey reveals how 660,000 Syrian refugee children will move into state schools (credit: theirworld.org)

Info: Bangladesh to build one of world’s largest refugee camps for 800,000 Rohingya (credit: The Guardian)

Rohingya crisis: Finding out the truth about Arsa militants (credit: BBC)

Aung San Suu Kyi unveils relief plans for Rohingya Muslims (credit: The Guardian)


Charter 4 Mobile

Charter 4 mobile

Anyone interested in fundamental rights in the European Union (EU) can now have easy access to the text of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights in all official languages on their mobile device: http://fra.europa.eu/en/charter4mobile



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First report for the Lancet Commission on Syria*

A report comes on the sixth year of the Syrian conflict, which grew out of the 2011 Arab Spring protests. There were nearly 200 attacks on healthcare facilities in 2016 alone, say the researchers.

*credit: The Guardian

Update of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The human rights instrument of international dimension is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Human dignity lies in the fundament. The massive abuses of human rights during World War II provoked the drafting of the Declaration in 1948.

Several decades after, in October 2013, a Global Citizenship Commission (GCC) was convened to assess the document and provide revisions and recommendations to governments and the international community.

As a former member of the European Parliament, I could take part in an event shedding light on the general idea of the Commission at Bonn University in May 2014. After the meeting, I submitted proposals related to different aspects of the Declaration, among others: the right against poverty, and the grave violations of children’s rights affected by armed conflict; children facing disability in that respect; schools at risk of armed conflict when used as military facilities, or when being attacked. All those issues are not explicitly stipulated in the document. Remark: within some days, it will be a second year of the mass abduction of the Chibok schoolgirls and the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, and – yet – a replacement school has not been built. Education in emergencies is demanding of embracing around 80 million affected children. The big news is that the EU will provide aid to help educate more than 2.3 million children in 42 countries living in emergencies.

On April 18, 2016, the GCC report will be presented in New York, focusing on the update of the Declaration as a living document in a changing world. Continue reading

The fourth tragic anniversary of the Syria crisis

European Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides expressed his great sadness for the fourth tragic anniversary of the Syria crisis.  He noted that Europe cares and stands in solidarity with the people of Syria. Rbb journalist Jörg Armbruster says “Syria can be described in one word: catastrophe.” The utmost responsibility falls upon the UN Security Council, Benjamin Barthes concludes, since its divisions on the political aspects of the conflict have allowed Damas to manipulate the humanitarian aspects. UNHCR has written a letter to the European Commission in which it proposes a number of changes in the way Europe handles Syrian refugees, according to Jyllands-Posten. And Robert Ottenhoff, head of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy in the US, explains that war in Syria is too hopeless for donors. In an op-ed piece in Le Monde, Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides writes that the EU, which is one of the main donors to humanitarian aid in the Syrian crisis with €3.35 billion, continues to support both the refugees and Syria’s neighbouring countries which welcome them. Yet, Mr Stylianides adds, it is not sufficient to meet the increasing humanitarian needs of the populations, and the international community must reinforce its support so as to manage the crisis in the long term.

 

Wrecked Syrian school where 10 children died in airstrike

http://www.aworldatschool.org/news/entry/Wrecked-Syrian-school-where-10-children-died-in-airstrike

 

The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism – Marwan Muasher

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pf2NnGcPODI&feature=player_embedded

Marwan Muasher, former foreign minister of Jordan, asserts that all sides—the United States, Europe, Israel, and Arab governments alike—were deeply misguided in their thinking about Arab politics and society when the turmoil of the Arab Spring erupted. He explains the causes of the unrest, tracing them back to the first Arab Awakening, and warns of the forces today that threaten the success of the Second Arab Awakening. Hope rests with the new generation and its commitment to tolerance, diversity, the peaceful rotation of power, and inclusive economic growth, Muasher maintains. He calls on the West to rethink political Islam and the Arab Israeli conflict, and he underscores the importance of efforts to strengthen education and expand traditional definitions of Arab citizenship for the long-term process of democratic transition.

Children in Central African Republic are targets of new wave of violence*

Thousands of children are at risk of being killed or maimed because of a new wave of violence in the Central African Republic.

More than 130 children have been murdered or seriously injured in the past few weeks, according to UNICEF.

Manuel Fontaine of UNICEF West and Central Africa said: “Civilians are under siege and at the mercy of daily attacks.

“The ongoing hostilities represent appalling acts of violence against children, women and men.”

The UN agency and its partners have stopped supplying safe drinking water to displaced families in the capital Bangul because of the security threats.

More than two million children have been affected by the fighting in CAR, which has been going on for more than a year.

A UNICEF spokesman said: “Our teams are also working hard to set up safe spaces for children and to reunite unaccompanied children with their families.

“However, more than a million children are in urgent need of health supplies, clean water and protection.

“The rainy season, beginning in March, will only worsen the situation for hundreds of thousands of children living in temporary sites across the country.

“We cannot let the Central African Republic become a forgotten crisis.”

*A World at School

Ukraine protests by Telegraph photographer David Rose in Kiev

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/worldnews/10606651/Ukraine-protests-by-Telegraph-photographer-David-Rose-in-Kiev.html

Chemical Weapons Report – UN Secretary-General’s Note

Syria

Holocaust – Part IV

Jewish Resistance and The Aftermath

As a rule, full-scale uprisings occurred only at the end, when Jews realized the inevitability of impending death. On April 19, 1943, nine months after the massive deportations of Warsaw’s Jews to Treblinka had begun, the Jewish resistance, led by 24-year-old Mordecai Anielewicz, mounted the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. In Vilna partisan leader Abba Kovner, recognizing the full intent of Nazi policy toward the Jews, called for resistance in December 1941 and organized an armed force that fought the Germans in September 1943.

At Treblinka and Sobibor uprisings occurred just as the extermination camps were being dismantled and their remaining prisoners were soon to be killed. This was also true at Auschwitz, where the Sonderkommando (“Special Commando”), the prisoner unit that worked in the vicinity of the gas chambers, destroyed a crematorium just as the killing was coming to an end in 1944. Continue reading

Holocaust – part III

The extermination camps

In early 1942 the Nazis built extermination camps at Treblinka, Sobibor, and Belzec in Poland. The death camps were to be the essential instrument of the “final solution.”

Auschwitz, perhaps the most notorious and lethal of the concentration camps, was actually three camps in one: a prison camp (Auschwitz I), an extermination camp (Auschwitz II–Birkenau), and a slave-labour camp (Auschwitz III–Buna-Monowitz). Upon arrival, Jewish prisoners faced what was called a Selektion. A German doctor presided over the selection of pregnant women, young children, the elderly, handicapped, sick, and infirm for immediate death in the gas chambers.

As necessary, the Germans selected able-bodied prisoners for forced labour in the factories adjacent to Auschwitz where one German company, IG Farben, invested 700,000 million Reichsmarks in 1942 alone to take advantage of forced labour. Deprived of adequate food, shelter, clothing, and medical care, these prisoners were literally worked to death. Periodically, they would face another Selektion. The Nazis would transfer those unable to work to the gas chambers of Birkenau.

Photograph:A group of Jewish men awaiting death in a gas van at the Chelmno death camp in German-occupied Poland.A group of Jewish men awaiting death in a gas van at the Chelmno        

                                                        death camp in German-occupied Poland.

© Instytut Pamieci Narodowej (Institute of National Remembrance)/United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

There were six extermination camps, all in German-occupied Poland, among the thousands of concentration and slave-labour camps throughout German-occupied Europe.

The impact of the Holocaust varied from region to region, and from year to year in the 21 countries that were directly affected. Nowhere was the Holocaust more intense and sudden than in Hungary. What took place over several years in Germany occurred over 16 weeks in Hungary. Entering the war as a German ally, Hungary had persecuted its Jews but not permitted their deportation. After Germany invaded Hungary on March 19, 1944, this situation changed dramatically. By mid-April the Nazis had confined Jews to ghettos. On May 15, deportations began, and over the next 55 days, the Nazis deported some 438,000 Jews from Hungary to Auschwitz on 147 trains.

Policies differed widely among Germany’s Balkan allies. In Romania it was primarily the Romanians themselves who slaughtered the country’s Jews. Toward the end of the war, however, when the defeat of Germany was all but certain, the Romanian government found more value in living Jews who could be held for ransom or used as leverage with the West. Bulgaria permitted the deportation of Jews from Thrace and Macedonia, but government leaders faced stiff opposition to the deportation of native Bulgarian Jews.

German-occupied Denmark rescued most of its own Jews by spiriting them to Sweden by sea in October 1943. This was possible partly because the German presence in Denmark was relatively small. Moreover, while anti-Semitism in the general population of many other countries led to collaboration with the Germans, Jews were an integrated part of Danish culture. Under these unique circumstances, Danish humanitarianism flourished.

In France, Jews under Fascist Italian occupation in the southeast fared better than the Jews of Vichy France, where collaborationist French authorities and police provided essential support to the understaffed German forces. The Jews in those parts of France under direct German occupation fared the worst. Although allied with Germany, the Italians did not participate in the Holocaust until Germany occupied northern Italy after the overthrow of the Fascist leader, Benito Mussolini.

 

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