Tribute to the victims of
terrorist attacks worldwide
Comments: 12767
Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)


News of the Day

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The Global Tantrum 
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Young people in partnership with @Theirworld demanded action on the #GlobalEducationCrisis and world leaders have listened. #IFFEd will unlock billions for children globally and help deliver a world where every child has a place in school. #LetMeLearn

Theirworld, Your Walk: Thank you! – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcwI3ZWZGc4

Nous venons de signer cette lettre ouverte pour demander aux chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement de faire de l’école gratuite pour tous les enfants un droit humain universel.


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Ten years on from Chibok, what happened to the 276 Nigerian girls snatched from their school? by The Guardian

When her Boko Haram captors told Margret Yama she would be going home, she thought it was a trick. She and the other girls kidnapped from their school in Chibok, in north-east Nigeria’s Borno state, had been held for three years and had been taunted before about the possibility of release. Keep reading – https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2024/apr/11/nigeria-chibok-boko-haram-girls-school-abductions-islamist-militants-borno-yobe-katsina-kaduna

As Gaza is bombed and starved, the Arab world is watching – and it’s angry by Nesrine Malik (The Guardian)

A few years after the end of Lebanon’s civil war, when the country seemed like one that had buried its past of conflict for ever, I heard an interview on the BBC with a Lebanese woman from Beirut that has stayed with me for 30 years. She was asked if the country, then a flourishing cultural hub that seemed to take over the Arab airwaves and satellite TV almost overnight, had healed the deep divisions that fuelled the war. “They are buried,” she said. “But if you squeeze me very tight, it’s all still there, deep inside me.” Continue reading: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/oct/22/gaza-bombed-starved-arab-world-watching-angry?

Survivors tell of the devastating impact of the US-led invasion 20 years on by Emma Graham-Harrison and Salim Habib

‘The US army destroyed our lives’: five Iraqis on the war that changed the Middle East

Twenty years ago today the US and the UK invaded Iraq in a disastrous military mission based on flawed intelligence, months of lying to the world, and a casual disregard for international law.

The invasion would lead to hundreds of thousands of civilian deaths, decades of civil war and vicious sectarian violence in Iraq, and the rise of the Islamic State militant group. Incubated in a US prison camp, IS was directed and staffed in part by former members and officers of the Saddam-era Ba’ath party.

In a pattern that would be repeated again and again over the following two decades of the “war on terror”, the US and its allies, including the United Kingdom, assumed that overwhelming technical and military superiority was all they needed to control a distant nation and its people.

Continue reading

10 years on, the Arab spring’s explosive rage and dashed dreams by The Guardian

A decade ago this week, a young fruit seller called Mohammed Bouazizi set himself alight outside the provincial headquarters of his home town in Tunisia, in protest against local police officials who had seized his cart and produce.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/dec/14/10-years-on-the-arab-springs-explosive-rage-and-dashed-dreams?utm_term=13945ef10e5110e90fb67aeddf8affe2&utm_campaign=MorningBriefingUK&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&CMP=morningbriefinguk_email

The humanitarian issue of our generation (by Legatum Institute)

Across the world today, there are more vulnerable migrants on the move than ever before. For far too many, this is a journey of necessity, not of choice.

Frustration and anger fuel wave of youth unrest in Arab world by The Guardian

Eight years after the Arab spring, unrest has shaken the Middle East and north Africa, amid youth joblessness and falling oil prices

10,000 children killed and maimed, hundreds of schools attacked in rising tide of violence by Billy Briggs*

A UN report has revealed a shocking increase in child casualties, schools targeted and recruitment of child soldiers in conflict-hit countries.

Unspeakable violence against children has been revealed in a new report from the United Nations which says more than 10,000 were killed or maimed last year.

Hundreds of new attacks on schools by armed factions around the world showed a “blatant disregard” by armed groups for both international law and children’s lives.

Disturbing new trends identified included the increasing use of children as suicide bombers and large-scale abductions of children.

Continue reading

The Guardian: When Jewish Americans uphold occupation, it corrodes our souls by Mariyama Scott*

On Monday, I joined over a hundred other young American Jews in Washington DC to protest Trump moving the US embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. As we marched, news rolled in of Palestinians killed by Israeli snipers at the Gaza separation fence. A staggering 37 people had been killed as we blocked Pennsylvania Avenue near the Capitol. By the time the protest ended, the death toll had passed 40. And at the end of the day, at least 58 people had been killed. It was the deadliest day in Gaza since the 2014 war on Gaza. Continue reading

Chibok Schoolgirls

Months ago, several girls out of 82 boarded a helicopter at the outskirts of Abuja, the capital of Nigeria. They were on the way to be reunited with their parents and classmates. After a re-integration programme, their education was resumed last September for those who wanted.

The group of 82 Chibok schoolgirls was released by Boko Haram after lengthy talks brokered by the Swiss government and the International Committee of the Red Cross and mediated by local lawyers.

Days ago, the first conviction of a man involved in the 2014 kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls from the town of Chibok, Borno state, northeast Nigeria, became a fact. A spokesman of the Justice ministry advised that the 35-year-old member of Boko Haram was given 15 years in jail after admitting to taking part in the abduction.

Hundreds of Boko Haram suspects have been tried by a special court. More than 1000 suspects are still held at the Kainji military detention facility. Continue reading

Tunisia: Austerity bites by The Economist

 

Seven years after sparking the Arab spring, Tunisians are back on the streets to protest against a new finance law. The law took effect on January 1st and has caused widespread price hikes. The government claims that it had no choice: it must bring the deficit down to honour a deal with the International Monetary Fund. This has not assuaged Tunisians, who are frustrated by a stagnant economy. Worse, they are in for more austerity

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