Tribute to the victims of
terrorist attacks worldwide
Comments: 12722
Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)


News of the Day

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The Global Tantrum 
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Young people in partnership with @Theirworld demanded action on the #GlobalEducationCrisis and world leaders have listened. #IFFEd will unlock billions for children globally and help deliver a world where every child has a place in school. #LetMeLearn

Theirworld, Your Walk: Thank you! – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcwI3ZWZGc4

Nous venons de signer cette lettre ouverte pour demander aux chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement de faire de l’école gratuite pour tous les enfants un droit humain universel.


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Ten years on from Chibok, what happened to the 276 Nigerian girls snatched from their school? by The Guardian

When her Boko Haram captors told Margret Yama she would be going home, she thought it was a trick. She and the other girls kidnapped from their school in Chibok, in north-east Nigeria’s Borno state, had been held for three years and had been taunted before about the possibility of release. Keep reading – https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2024/apr/11/nigeria-chibok-boko-haram-girls-school-abductions-islamist-militants-borno-yobe-katsina-kaduna

Rapunzel reimagined: the women retelling fairytales to challenge notions of perfection by The Guardian

When disabled people don’t see themselves in the world, it tells us that we don’t deserve to exist, that these stories are not for us, that stories of love and friendship are not for us, and certainly not happy endings,” says Nidhi Ashok Goyal, the founder of Rising Flame.

And They Lived … Ever After is a new book produced by the Indian feminist disability rights group, which collects together retellings of classic European fairytales – including Snow White, Cinderella and Rapunzel – written by south Asian women with disabilities.

Survivors tell of the devastating impact of the US-led invasion 20 years on by Emma Graham-Harrison and Salim Habib

‘The US army destroyed our lives’: five Iraqis on the war that changed the Middle East

Twenty years ago today the US and the UK invaded Iraq in a disastrous military mission based on flawed intelligence, months of lying to the world, and a casual disregard for international law.

The invasion would lead to hundreds of thousands of civilian deaths, decades of civil war and vicious sectarian violence in Iraq, and the rise of the Islamic State militant group. Incubated in a US prison camp, IS was directed and staffed in part by former members and officers of the Saddam-era Ba’ath party.

In a pattern that would be repeated again and again over the following two decades of the “war on terror”, the US and its allies, including the United Kingdom, assumed that overwhelming technical and military superiority was all they needed to control a distant nation and its people.

Continue reading

Reflections

*People have the right to defend their civilisational identity. Throughout history the European Union has pursued its own path to make it happen. So have other nations and countries.

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*Differences have persisted. Yet, they are not to set nations and countries apart.

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*Diversity and the commitment to inclusion are vital to human civilisation. Values, per se, capture the complex nature of any society. Complementarity in their exchange and/or integration may prove to be an achievement of humanity.

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*The EU’s understanding of these peculiarities may help transport into the future the idea of free expression of national identity, components of which are culture, religion, moral and ethical standards… They open the way to a holistic view of human development in any part of the world. This approach is worthy of respect, right?

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WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON IMMIGRANTS AND THEIR CHILDREN? (by OECD)

Both the experience from previous economic crises and first indications on labour market and social outcomes during the current pandemic suggest that the COVID-19 crisis is likely to have a disproportionate impact on immigrants and their children. Please read the analysis: https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/?ref=137_137245-8saheqv0k3&title=What-is-the-impact-of-the-COVID-19-pandemic-on-immigrants-and-their-children%3F

 

 

OECD Policy Observatory on Artificial Intelligence*

https://www.oecd.org/going-digital/ai/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=FIND%20OUT%20MORE&utm_campaign=OECD%20Civil%20Society%20Newsletter%20-%20February%202020&utm_term=demo

Oxford diversity jumps *

A record 70% of Oxford University’s undergraduates next year will come from state schools. Five years ago state school applicants to Oxford received just 56% of undergraduate offers and 43% went to those educated at independent schools, despite a substantial imbalance in the numbers applying. The university found itself regularly criticised for ignoring well-qualified, state-educated students, especially from black or disadvantaged backgrounds. Target Oxbridge – a diversity recruitment programme which has the author Zadie Smith as a patron – says it has helped a record number of British students of black heritage gain places at Oxford and Cambridge. Naomi Kellman, one of its founders, said: “We started with just six students in 2012, and so it is amazing to see the programme now supporting over 70 black British students to secure Oxbridge offers.”

*The Guardian

Our Failure to Protect: Political commitment is vital to prevent and respond to young newcomers going missing in Europe*

It is 2015, and Europol have sent a shockwave through Europe with news that, according to national reports, at least 10,000 unaccompanied migrant children have gone missing; today, we know that this was only the tip of the iceberg. Between 2014 and 2017, at least 30,000 young newcomers, escaping violence or poverty in their home countries, disappeared on European soil (Source: European Migration Network). Children going missing in migration risk facing exploitation, violence, starvation, homelessness and physical and mental health problems. Our failure to protect them from such risks is a violation of their fundamental rights. Continue reading

The humanitarian issue of our generation (by Legatum Institute)

Across the world today, there are more vulnerable migrants on the move than ever before. For far too many, this is a journey of necessity, not of choice.

A Temporary Shift: What happens when immigrants have to wait longer to obtain permanent residency?*

*https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/180128-birthe-larsen/posts/52950-a-temporary-shift-what-happens-when-immigrants-have-to-wait-longer-to-obtain-permanent-residency?utm_source=newsletter_mailer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

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