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Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)

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Parlement

As there have been requests to me to have some more references to the origin of “Parley“, please find an article* concerning Parlement and interesting details stemming from history.

Parlement, the supreme court under the ancien régime in France. It developed out of the Curia Regis (King’s Court), in which the early kings of the Capetian dynasty (987–1328) periodically convened their principal vassals and prelates to deliberate with them on feudal and political matters. It also dealt with the few legal cases submitted to the king as sovereign judge.

Throughout the 12th century and in the first decades of the 13th, the Curia Regis grew in importance, and professional advisers, or consiliarii, were added to its membership. Meanwhile, by a slow process, judicial sessions came to be differentiated from meetings for other business; and by about 1250, during the reign of Louis IX (1226–70), these judicial sessions were being described as curia regis in parlemento (“speaking”), or Parlement. The curia in parlemento also began hearing appeals against the judgments of baillis (representatives of the royal administration in the provinces) and deciding cases concerning the royal towns. The expansion of the royal domain further enlarged the competence of the curia in parlemento, which also could serve politically to strengthen the royal power by means of its arrêts (final decisions), since these expressed the king’s law with incontestable authority.

Louis IX had his curia in parlemento installed in a special Chambre aux Plaids, or pleading chamber, on what is now the site of the modern Palais de Justice in Paris. The Grand Chambre, as the Chambre aux Plaids came to be called, remained the core of Parlement, although other chambres grew up alongside it, including the Chambre des Enquêtes (“inquiries”) and the Chambre des Requêtes (“petitions”), both instituted in the 14th century; the criminal chamber, known as the Chambre de la Tournelle (“tower”; so called because it sat in a turret in the palace), formally instituted in the 16th century but in existence much earlier; and the Chambre de l’Édit (“edict”), instituted in the 16th century to deal with Huguenot affairs but finally abolished in 1669.

Vacant seats in the Parlement in the later Middle Ages were supposed to be filled by election or co-optation, but from the 14th century members had resigned in favour of their sons or sold their seats to others. In 1552 venality was formally recognized by the crown. Attempts to abolish it later in the century came to nothing, and in 1604 the paulette, a new tax devised by financier Charles Paulet, was established, enabling officeholders to ensure the hereditability of their offices by paying one-sixtieth of its purchase price every year. However, the office of premier president, the head of Parlement, could be acquired only by a nominee of the crown.

Originally there was only one Parlement, that of Paris. Others were created later for the provinces, but the Parlement of Paris retained jurisdiction over nearly half the kingdom.

The political pretensions of the Parlements were based on their registration of the king’s edicts and letters patent. Before registering a measure, the Parlements examined it to see that it conformed with the principles of law and justice and with the interests of the king and realm; if it did not, they withheld registration and addressed remonstrances to the king. If the king wished to force registration, he had to order it in a letter or appear in person before the Parlement in a special session called the lit de justice (literally “bed of justice,” a term originally used to describe the seat occupied by the king in these proceedings), where his presence would suspend any delegation of authority to his magistrates.

During the 16th and early 17th centuries the Parlements took up a course of systematic opposition to the crown. Although this activity was restricted under Louis XIV (1643–1715), who punished the Parlement by severely restricting their right to remonstrance for nearly 50 years, it was resumed in the 18th century. By that time, the members’ opposition was largely motivated by their desire to maintain their own privileges; nevertheless, it served to focus more general feelings of political and social discontent. At the same time, however, the Parlements were looked upon as a source of privilege and reaction, and they were swept away early in the French Revolution.

*credit: Encyclopaedia Britannica

 

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