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“ANIMAL FARM” Revisit Ignored

A story of modern times

The story as follows is not about preaching morality in politics. It is about times when the interpretation and distortion of facts become essential political strategies.

“The Major, a boar on the Farm, gathers the animals in a meeting. In his speech he refers to the humans as parasites and proclaims new rules.

When he dies a few days later, two young pigs take control of the group and try to turn his dreams into a reality.

After a while, they start a struggle for leadership. When one announces his ideas, the other opposes them. The confrontation results in one of the pigs being forced to leave the farm.

Using a new pig as a mouthpiece of the group, the fake leader announces the ideas of the expelled pig as if they are his own.

In the course of time the leader abuses his powers; he wants more and more privileges; the mouthpiece justifies every statement the leader makes; an anthem glorifies him, seemingly starting to have the lifestyle of a man. The animals, though starving and exhausted, believe they live better. The mouthpiece invents numbers to demonstrate their improved standard of living.

In the meanwhile, an attack on the farm brings great losses to the animals. They win the battle, but exchange one of the wounded for money to buy spirits.

Time passes, and the pigs get sophisticated, wearing clothes and carrying whips. The leader announces an alliance with the humans.

The animals on the Farm realize that the faces of the pigs start to resemble the faces of humans and no one can tell the difference between them.”

Any similarities with reality is a sheer coincidence.

Mariela Baeva

Animal farm revisited ignored | New Europe

 

 

Reflections

*People have the right to defend their civilisational identity. Throughout history the European Union has pursued its own path to make it happen. So have other nations and countries.

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*Differences have persisted. Yet, they are not to set nations and countries apart.

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*Diversity and the commitment to inclusion are vital to human civilisation. Values, per se, capture the complex nature of any society. Complementarity in their exchange and/or integration may prove to be an achievement of humanity.

———

*The EU’s understanding of these peculiarities may help transport into the future the idea of free expression of national identity, components of which are culture, religion, moral and ethical standards… They open the way to a holistic view of human development in any part of the world. This approach is worthy of respect, right?

———

 

Facing the jobs crisis*

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered one of the worst jobs crises since the Great Depression. There is a real danger that the crisis will increase poverty and widen inequalities, with the impact felt for years to come. Countries now need to do everything they can to stop this jobs crisis from turning into a social crisis. Reconstructing a better and more resilient labour market is an essential investment in the future and in future generations.

http://oecd.org/employment-outlook?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=digitalreport&utm_campaign=empoutlookjul2020&utm_term=pac

Report: OECD Employment Outlook 2020 WORKER SECURITY AND THE COVID-19 CRISIS

*OECD

Tax in the time of COVID-19*

The number of COVID-19 cases is quickly rising around the world, with major adverse effects on health and mortality. To fight the outbreak and the spread of the virus, countries are imposing unprecedented measures, such as restrictions on the free movement of people and goods, and are shutting down large parts of the economy. The result is that economic activity has fallen sharply in many countries and increased global uncertainty has further eroded confidence.

Read more: https://www.oecd-forum.org/users/369395-pascal-saint-amans/posts/63721-tax-in-the-time-of-covid-19?utm_source=newsletter_mailer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

*OECD, The Forum Network

Tackling the coronavirus*

Contributing to a global effort

What are the impacts and consequences of the coronavirus pandemic on our lives and our societies – and what are some of the solutions we can find to boost our healthcare systems, secure our businesses, maintain our jobs and education, and stabilise financial markets and economies?

Find solutions here: http://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/en/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=CTA%3A%20Key%20Impacts&utm_campaign=Tackling%20the%20coronavirus%20%28COVID-19%29&utm_term=demo#id-2

*OECD

Just launched: OECD Economic Outlook 2019

World GDP growth fell to 2.9% this year

The Economic Outlook includes a general assessment and notes summarising developments and providing projections for each individual country. This issue also includes focus notes on topical policy questions: addressing trade-distorting government support, escaping the low-inflation trap and strengthening the role of fiscal policy.

Read the full report

International Migration: The Human Face of Globalisation*

Table of contents | Corrigenda | How to order
Multilingual Summaries

Almost 3% of the world’s population – or about 190 million people – live outside the land of their birth. These migrants bring energy, entrepreneurship and fresh ideas to our societies. But there are downsides, too: Young migrants who fail in education, adults who don’t find work and, of course, unregulated migration. Such challenges make migration a political lightning rod. But how can we move beyond the noise of debate to get to the facts?

OECD Insights: International Migration explores migration today, and asks this question: How can governments ensure it benefits immigrants, the societies in which they settle and the homes they leave behind?

Table of contents

Foreword by Anthony Gooch Director, Public Affairs and Communications Directorate, OECD

Chapter 1. The Migration Debate

Migration can be controversial, in part because it touches on so many areas of public life, including economics, demographics, national security, culture and even religion.

Chapter 2. Migration Then and Now

For almost as long as humans have walked the Earth, we have sought new homes. Today, that journey continues for many millions of people around the globe.

Chapter 3. Managing Migration

Our ability to travel is restricted by international rules and regulations. But, equally, international agreements give many people significant rights to settle abroad.

Chapter 4. Migration and Education

The track record of young immigrants in schooling is mixed – some do exceptionally well but others encounter problems that can hold them back throughout life.

Chapter 5. Migrants and Work

Migrants can be a key addition to the workforce, even if their presence may be resented and they are not always able to make the best use of their skills.

Chapter 6. Migration and Development

For developing countries, migration can be a blessing by providing remittances and overseas contacts, but a curse for taking away the brightest and the best.

Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion…

Policies will need to go on evolving if migrants, the societies they leave and those they join are to continue benefiting from migration. Plus: How migration is measured.

References

*OECD Insights

You remember Sisyphus from Greek mythology, right?

You remember Sisyphus from Greek mythology, right? The king rolling a stone toward the crest of a hill….

He could never heave the stone over the top, “the weight would turn it back…”

The story tells he was punished for cheating.

In more recent times, this folklore figure stirred the creative imagination of a French author, Albert Camus. His Myth of Sisyphus: Essay on the Absurd tells the story of the absurd hero accomplishing nothing. The tragedy begins the moment he knows his labour is hopeless.

This is his moment of consciousness. Back down the hill to start pushing up the stone for “a hundred times over.”

The essay teaches that futile suffering is a preference. It is the absurd hero’s silent joy. It is the price for his victory. He is the master of the day. If the stone is still rolling, the absurd hero is still busy and active.

Sisyphus of Camus teaches too much self-confidence may raise rocks.

In the tragedy of Syria, who is in the struggle toward the heights? You can finish the story: one, two, three, four, more absurd heroes…

Mariela Baeva

Mohamed Sidibay for Theirworld and Global Partnership for Education’s conference in Senegal,

Dear Mariela,

A few days ago, I asked you: what is the one question you want me to ask  world leaders?

It was a few hours before a key moment for the campaign to fund education – the Global Partnership for Education’s replenishment conference in Dakar, Senegal, where I was going to deliver the keynote speech.

And you were clear that the biggest question of the moment was: what will you do to turn the decline in education financing around and ensure that every child can realise their right to education?

To be honest, when I sent you that email, I was feeling a bit sceptical. For years aid to education has been stagnating or going down. I’ve spoken at big events before.

What was going to change this time? And why now? Continue reading

How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies*

Link to How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies

*OECD Development Centre

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