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Mohamed Sidibay for Theirworld and Global Partnership for Education’s conference in Senegal,

Dear Mariela,

A few days ago, I asked you: what is the one question you want me to ask  world leaders?

It was a few hours before a key moment for the campaign to fund education – the Global Partnership for Education’s replenishment conference in Dakar, Senegal, where I was going to deliver the keynote speech.

And you were clear that the biggest question of the moment was: what will you do to turn the decline in education financing around and ensure that every child can realise their right to education?

To be honest, when I sent you that email, I was feeling a bit sceptical. For years aid to education has been stagnating or going down. I’ve spoken at big events before.

What was going to change this time? And why now? Continue reading

How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies*

Link to How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies

*OECD Development Centre

RESILIENCE IN A TIME OF HIGH DEBT*

http://www.oecd.org/eco/outlook/Resilience-in-a-time-of-high-debt-november-2017-OECD-economic-outlook-presentation.pdf

*OECD

 

Key Facts on Education (OECD)

Key Facts on Education (OECD)
Did You Know? Key Facts on Education

State-owned enterprises, international investment and national security: The way forward*

For most of the past half century, countries around the world have gradually opened up to foreign investment, and with good effect. Investment from other countries has supported growth and development, created jobs and enhanced welfare. Today, as our data show, OECD economies retain only limited traditional regulatory restrictions to inward foreign investment in the form of foreign ownership ceilings and other discriminatory conditions. While many emerging economies are generally less open, they have made their legal regimes for foreign direct investment less restrictive. Continue reading

A portrait of family migration*

Migration is all over the news in Europe, North America and Australia. When people think about migration, they tend to picture either refugees driven to undertake dangerous journeys in order to escape threatening situations or people coming to a new country to pursue studies or work. Yet there is a large category of migrants all too often overlooked: family migrants. Such migrants accounted for 40% of migration to the OECD area in 2015 and they typically make up 25-50% of an OECD country’s foreign-born population – and as much as 70% in the United States.

Why is family migration receiving so little attention? Continue reading

For globalisation to work for all, you have to level the playing field first*

Today the debate rages about whether the decline in living standards is due to the effects of globalisation or to poor domestic policies. Both have surely played a role. But the problems often associated with globalisation (inequality, the hollowing out of the middle class, employment of less-skilled workers in advanced countries, etc.) do not originate from “openness” as such. The problem is that not all countries are open to the same degree and the playing field in the cross-border activities of businesses is not level. Continue reading

A home truth: We need better quality and more affordable housing*

Alice Pittini, OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

A home is meant to be a safe and secure shelter for individuals and families, fulfilling the basic need to have a roof over your head. Yet a home is also a tradable asset, an investment from which there’s potentially big money to be made, or to be lost as the global financial crisis has shown us. Although the crisis led to a general drop in house prices in the short term, house prices have since picked up again in most countries and today they are growing faster than incomes in Austria, Canada, Germany, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Continue reading

Last year, students from a university club of a country that stretches over Asia and Europe initiated a project. In pursuit of integrating their international colleagues from Syria and other countries, the students asked them to paint bird houses and showcase their talents and aspirations.

Imagine we ask today the 11 million child refugees and asylum-seekers to paint 11 million bird houses and hang them out, probably starting from the border of the U.S. with Mexico. The way we build today fences and walls in Europe and elsewhere, this bulwark may claim to be the longest barrier in the world. It may symbolize our astonishing compassion failure and trumping nationalism.

Mariela Baeva

 

 

OECD countries need to address the migration backlash*

The public is losing faith in the capacity of governments to manage migration. Opinion polls in a wide range of countries suggest that the share of the public holding extreme anti-immigration views has grown in recent years and that these extreme views are more frequently heard in public debates. In part, this is due to the perception that no end is in sight for large migration inflows and that countries have lost control over them. People are concerned about the short-term impact of large inflows of migrants, and refugees in particular, and many feel that migration is threatening their economic, social as well as personal security. Common concerns are that migration is unmanaged and borders are not secured; immigrants stretch local services, such as social housing, health and education, to the detriment of local populations; immigration benefits the rich, with the poor finding themselves competing with immigrants for jobs, and wages for low-skilled work depressed; and many migrants do not want to integrate and may even oppose the values of host societies. Continue reading

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