Tribute to the victims of
terrorist attacks worldwide
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Mariela Baeva
Mariela Baeva
Member of the European Parliament for Bulgaria
2007 - 2009
(first direct EP elections in Bulgaria);

LEED to OECD partner (Nanotech)

Charter 4 Mobile

Charter 4 mobile

Anyone interested in fundamental rights in the European Union (EU) can now have easy access to the text of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights in all official languages on their mobile device: http://fra.europa.eu/en/charter4mobile



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Rohingya refugee children need urgent help to deal with their trauma*

Safe spaces and schools are vital if huge numbers of children fleeing from violence in Myanmar are to recover from their toxic stress.

Almost 60% of the Rohingya refugees fleeing ethnic atrocities in Myanmar are children – and many are escaping on their own.

Stories of violence against women and children – villages burned, infants thrown in rivers, toddlers and mothers shot – abound from makeshift camps in neighbouring Bangladesh, where survivors are struggling to find clean water, food and proper shelter.

Hundreds of children at the camps have been separated from their families and the numbers are growing daily.  Continue reading

Building the Future: Children and Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries – Innocenti Report*

Building the Future: Children and Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries is the latest in the Innocenti Report Card series, which analyses inequality in 41 high-income countries. It looks at how far children are falling behind in the dimensions of income, education, health and life satisfaction. Continue reading

For globalisation to work for all, you have to level the playing field first*

Today the debate rages about whether the decline in living standards is due to the effects of globalisation or to poor domestic policies. Both have surely played a role. But the problems often associated with globalisation (inequality, the hollowing out of the middle class, employment of less-skilled workers in advanced countries, etc.) do not originate from “openness” as such. The problem is that not all countries are open to the same degree and the playing field in the cross-border activities of businesses is not level. Continue reading

Timor-Leste: Life beyond oil*

The end of the oil era may be coming, but the lights will stay on in Timor Leste. Almost two-thirds of the population are younger than 24, and they are keen for a chance at a better life. With the right mix of inclusive planning, grassroots development and support for a vital private sector, the transition to a non-oil economy may signal bright days ahead for this young nation.

Timor Leste has achieved remarkable progress since restoration of independence in 2002. Continue reading

A home truth: We need better quality and more affordable housing*

Alice Pittini, OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

A home is meant to be a safe and secure shelter for individuals and families, fulfilling the basic need to have a roof over your head. Yet a home is also a tradable asset, an investment from which there’s potentially big money to be made, or to be lost as the global financial crisis has shown us. Although the crisis led to a general drop in house prices in the short term, house prices have since picked up again in most countries and today they are growing faster than incomes in Austria, Canada, Germany, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Continue reading

Empower a Girl. Change the World.

Dear Colleagues,

Throughout the world, adolescent girls are at risk of disappearing from the international development agenda and public awareness.

Despite progress in many arenas, adolescent girls risk disappearing from lack of education. They are disappearing because of preventable diseases. They are disappearing because of child marriage. They are disappearing from lack of investment in policies, interventions and services tailored to their specific needs and concerns.

At the same time there are nearly 600 million girls aged 10 to 19 in the world today, each with limitless individual potential. Continue reading

Progress for women and girls in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

The UN Sustainable Development Goals could be a real game changer for gender issues, with wins in fraught areas such as reproductive rights. But there will be challenges, and opposing voices, to contend with in the years ahead.

“It always seems impossible until it’s done.” Few words could have better captured the sentiment in the room when the Group of 77 (G77) and China quoted Nelson Mandela at the United Nations before announcing, “We are ready to adopt!” On 2 August, after three years of intense deliberations and negotiations, all 193 governments of the UN agreed what could prove to be a historic new agenda for people and planet.

There were times when an ambitious agreement seemed fanciful. Fault lines had surfaced on a whole host of issues, from human rights to climate change, not to mention how to deal out responsibility. But governments hashed it out and Agenda 2030–with the so-called Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at its centre–will be formally adopted by world leaders at the UN General Assembly in September. While the real litmus test will lie in its implementation, could this new roadmap be as “game-changing” as proponents claim? Continue reading

Targeted Policies to Eradicate Poverty*

Poverty has been halved in less than 25 years worldwide. The enormous progress over the past few decades is mainly due to rapid economic growth in the South. China’s economy grew by 10% for decades and 600 million people were consequently brought out of poverty.
Economic growth in poor nations is crucial. But it will not be possible to end extreme poverty by 2030 through economic growth alone, even if African countries grow at 10% for the next 15 years. Poverty eradication will require specific policies targeting the most vulnerable groups. The remaining poor tend to be women, minorities, indigenous peoples and the disabled. Poor people are increasingly living in the countryside and in countries in conflict. Read more

*OECD Insights Blog

The measure of poverty*

The economic crisis recedes in the rear-view mirror, but its impact on people’s lives remains visible. Two groups show particular signs of lingering economic hurt – the poor and the young. According to the OECD, poverty rose by 2 percentage points in rich countries between 2007 and 2011, and by rather more in countries like Spain and Greece.

Now, if you’re a regular reader, you may be asking yourself, what sort of poverty? Continue reading

Girls with Books: A New Global Power

International Women’s Day, 8 March, is when the world recognises women, their achievements and the importance of standing up for their rights.

In honour of #IWD2014 we present the story of girls battling for the right to become educated women and reach their full potential in the film Girls with Books: A New Global Power.

Click to view the film "A new Global Power: Girls with Books"

Today’s girls will be the women of tomorrow: and if a girl is educated, her value to her family, her community and their economic well-being is proven to increase.  One extra year in school alone will increase a woman’s lifetime income by at least 10%.

Please take a moment to watch the video and share it with your family and friends on Twitter or Facebook.

And on 12 March we will host a Google Hangout to discuss Girls with Books and why they are the New Global Power – tune in at 11AM EST/4PM GMT and join A World at School and girls’ education advocates from around the world.

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